The 2016 Winter State Games

One of the things that makes me happiest is Special Olympics competitions. I love supporting the athletes, and I love watching them win. This past weekend at Special Olympics New York’s Winter State Games, I was able to do just that, which probably explains why I couldn’t stop smiling throughout the Games.

Special Olympics New York’s Winter State Games, one of three state competitions where athletes from around New York qualify to compete, was held February 19 and 20 in Poughkeepsie, New York. The town of Poughkeepsie was an amazing host and even put up Special Olympics New York flags around the town and featured our athletes on the front page of the newspaper.

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The Games started with an Opening Ceremony in the Mid-Hudson Civic Center. The amount of love and support inside of the Civic Center was astounding. The stands were completely filled, the lines of volunteers cheering and high fiving athletes during the Parade of Athletes were tireless and loud, and the speeches were heartfelt. Many people from the community who had done a lot of work planning the Games spoke, as well as Thomas Adimari, the Hudson Valley athlete who competed in Tennis at the World Games. After the speeches and the Athletes’ Oath, it was time for the torch to be run in.

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IMG_8710At every State Games, law enforcement officers run alongside an athlete carrying the Flame of Hope. Together, they light the cauldron together. This is always my favorite part, and this time definitely didn’t disappoint.

The next day, I was able to go to two different venues, thanks to one of my friends who is a very good Special Olympics volunteer photographer. First, we went to Holiday Mountain, where the Cross-Country Skiing, Alpine Skiing, and Snowshoe took place.

IMG_8755Because there wasn’t enough snow, the Cross-Country Skiing competition was held on a field that was packed with snow. Volunteers had marked lanes for each skier to go down. It was really fun to watch! I hadn’t seen anything like it before, and the competition was very fast-paced with a lot of volunteers cheering the athletes. Snowshoe was held on the same course, but it was later in the day.

While at Holiday Mountain, I also watched Alpine Skiing. The athletes skied down the hill and had to go around gates. It looked like the slalom event in the Olympics.

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After skiing, we traveled to the Figure Skating, which I was very happy to see. Many of the skaters who I saw at last year’s State Games were there, so it was cool to recognize them and to know some of their names. While watching the skaters, I got chills because their routines were all so beautiful, and I could tell that they put their hearts and souls into everything they did on the ice. All of the skaters had fun routines. One of my favorite routines was a skater who dressed like Charlie Brown and skated to Linus and Lucy’s theme. There was also someone who performed to “Shake It Off” by Taylor Swift and another skater who skated to a song from Grease and dressed like a Pink Lady.

Then, around 8 pm, Closing Ceremony or the Victory Dance was held. I missed this last year, so this was a new experience for me. Basically, all of the athletes and a lot of the staff and coaches let loose and dance together. The athletes wear their medals and celebrate their accomplishments. Although we were all very tired by that time, we had fun. And then, the Winter Games were over for another year, and everyone went home happier than they had been. Athletes had more medals to celebrate and add to their collection, volunteers had new experiences to cherish, and I had another memory to add to my Special Olympics journey.

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Some of the athletes at the Closing Ceremony

The Olympics in Bryant Park

On a very cold night on February 5, I joined Nicole and Lena (Special Olympics New York athletes), Adam Rippon (the 2016 U.S. National Champion), Caydee Denning and John Coughlin (the 2012 U.S. National Champions), and the Skyliners (a synchronized ice skating team) at the Bryant Park ice skating rink. The show was absolutely beautiful to watch.

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The Special Olympics New York crew with Adam Rippon

I went to this event last year (see here for that blog post), but this one was even better. Lena, a Special Olympics athlete from Queens, spoke at the beginning to welcome all of the spectators to the show. She was really able to play to the crowd, and by the end of her speech, I could tell that everyone couldn’t wait for the show to start. Bank of America, the sponsor of the event, also spoke, and they presented Special Olympics New York with a $10,000 check!

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Nicole and Lena with the check!

It was really fun to be backstage with all of the athletes, and I was able to talk to them before and after they went on the ice. Nicole, a Special Olympian from Syracuse, went first, and she skated with so much passion. She was a real artist on the ice.

 

After Nicole, the pair went. They performed last year, and they seemed to have only gotten better. I couldn’t believe all the tricks they did! I’m pretty sure I watched their entire show with my mouth wide open. It was incredible.

The Skyliners were next. I had never seen a synchronized ice skating team before, so I wasn’t sure what to expect. I certainly didn’t expect there to be so many skaters! Their performance was beautiful to watch because they were so fluid in their motions. Everyone flowed together perfectly.

Caydee and John did another small performance to keep the crowd’s excitement up because by that time, it was bitterly cold. Last, Adam Rippon performed. His skating was more like modern dance. He had all of the technical elements there, but he also invoked so much emotion into his performance. It’s not hard to see how he won the 2016 U.S. Figure Skating Championships.

All in all, it was an amazing experience. I was able to watch beautiful performances in person with my friends next to me. It was a real showcase of the magic of the Olympic Movement.

 

My Special Olympics Anniversary

Yesterday was my one year anniversary for volunteering with Special Olympics. On February 6, 2015, I began my Special Olympics journey at the 2015 Winter State Games in Syracuse. On that day, I helped put up arenas for Floor Hockey and watched my first ever Opening Ceremony. It has been a really special year since then, and it’s all because of Special Olympics.

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At the Empire State Building to welcome the World Games athletes home

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I’m so happy that I’m a part of the Special Olympics family, a family of truly inspiring individuals who love the Olympic Movement just as much as I do. From the employees at Special Olympics New York to the athletes to the volunteers in New York and LA, Special Olympics constantly reminds me that the world is full of good people. It pushes me to want to be a better person, and it makes me happy to see the athletes compete and succeed over hurdles in sports and in the world.

IMG_7360One of my favorite Special Olympics memories from the past year happened at a Basketball Skills competition. One of the athletes, the self-proclaimed Gold Medal Ted, asked my supervisor and I if he could sing, and it was decided that he could sing during the Closing Ceremony. After the medals were awarded to the athletes, it was time for the Closing Ceremony to begin.

Ted stood in front of the microphone, and first, he thanked everyone for coming. Then, he explained to all of the volunteers and the athletes that he was going to sing “What a Wonderful World” for them and also for his mom who was in Heaven. He began singing, and it was an unexplainably beautiful moment. The gym, which had been filled with the sound of basketballs pounding on the floor just moments before, was so quiet as everyone listened to his beautiful, emotion-filled voice. Although Ted didn’t actually win a gold medal in Basketball Skills, he won a gold medal in our hearts by living according to the Special Olympics’ Athlete Oath: “Let me win, but if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt.”

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Athletes like Ted make me so happy that I have had the opportunity to work and volunteer for Special Olympics. It’s an organization I believe in, and although I don’t know what I will do after I graduate, I know that I will always support Special Olympics. Here’s to another year!

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How to Find Volunteering Opportunities

IMG_9237 watermarkIn 2015, I started volunteering more than I had ever done before. This was because of a few reasons. One, I had figured out that it’s really easy to volunteer in New York City. There are so many nonprofits throughout the city, and they almost always need free help. Two, I enjoy doing it. It’s fun, and it makes me happy. Three (and this is the reason for today’s blog post), it is a way to further your career in a field. Besides internships and jobs, volunteering is a great way to gain experience in your field, network in your field, and get an inside look at an organization.

Because my friend noticed that my volunteering had increased in 2015, she recently asked me for tips on how to find volunteer opportunities. After helping her, I decided to write a blog post on it.

Here are five tips on how to find volunteer opportunities.

  1. Figure out the field or nonprofit where you want to volunteer. This is the most important tip because without it, the experience won’t be worthwhile for you. You should enjoy what you’re doing, or you’ll be wasting your time.
  2. Google it. Search for “Volunteering opportunities ________ New York City (or whatever location you’re in)” or some variation of this. For example, I Googled “volunteering opportunities Olympics New York City” and “volunteering opportunities sports New York City” to create my list of where to volunteer in 2016.
  3. Identify specific nonprofits that have missions you like and agree with, and then find events they have where you can volunteer. For some nonprofits, you can even volunteer to work in their office. Just find someone who works in the department you would like to work in and email that person.
  4. Utilize volunteer websites, such as idealist.org and  volunteermatch.org. Even if you aren’t able to find volunteer opportunities on these websites, they can often point you toward a specific organization where you might like volunteer in the future.
  5. If you find an organization you like, look at its employees’ bios, especially the CEO’s. By doing this, you can usually identify other related organizations and thus, more places for you to volunteer!

Here’s to more volunteering!

A Look Ahead to the Winter State Games

It’s less than one month to Special Olympics New York’s Winter State Games, and I’m excited! They begin on February 19 with the Opening Ceremonies and then continue on Saturday with Floor Hockey, Figure Skating, Alpine Skiing, Cross-Country Skiing, and Snowshoe. The Games will be held in the Hudson Valley this year, which is so close to NYC!

Because it’s less than a month to the Games, here’s a little about what to expect.

11402994_10205095091596684_5058970810769487803_nFloor Hockey

Special Olympics’ Floor Hockey is different from what you might expect mainly because the equipment is different from standard hockey equipment. The puck has a hole in the middle, and players use sticks without the flat part at the bottom to move it around. Only goalies have regular hockey sticks. It’s really fun to watch because everyone is so competitive and passionate about the game. Here are some photos from the 2015 Winter State Games and the 2015 Peter Aquilone Memorial Floor Hockey Tournament.

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Floor Hockey Skills

Figure Skating

This is my favorite winter sport because it’s so beautiful to watch. I can’t ice skate at all, so that makes it even more special. I volunteered at the Figure Skating last year, and these skaters are so good! They were doing jumps and skating with only one leg while making everything look so easy as they danced across the ice. I’ll be volunteering at this event again this year!

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Alpine Skiing, Cross-Country Skiing, and Snowshoe

I have never seen the other events, Alpine Skiing, Cross-Country Skiing, and Snowshoe, but they always look like fun. Here are some photos of these events from 2015 that I borrowed from Special Olympics New York’s SmugMug page:

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I hope you’re now as excited for the Special Olympics New York Winter State Games as I am!

Here is a blog post where I go into a lot more detail about my experience at the 2015 Winter State Games: https://theolympicsofblogs.wordpress.com/2015/07/20/countdown-to-the-world-games-day-5/

Thanks for reading!

 

Plunging into the Cold

In honor of the blizzard yesterday, here is a blog post about the two Special Olympics Polar Plunges I participated in last year.

Special Olympics is known for its Polar Plunges. In different states, they are known as Polar Bear Plunges or Penguin Plunges, but in New York, they are Polar Plunges. Basically, a Polar Plunge is where people in the community raise money for Special Olympics, and then they come together to plunge into icy waters to celebrate. Some Special Olympic athletes even raise money and plunge. Special Olympics New York City has three plunges every year: Westchester, Staten Island, and the Rockaways.

The Rockaways is early in the year, so I missed that one for 2015. However, I volunteered at the Westchester and Staten Island Polar Plunges, and I’m planning on going to the 2016 Rockaways Plunge on March 12 at Jacob Riis Park.

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Westchester Polar Plunge

The Westchester Plunge happened November 14. It was held in a very beautiful park just outside the city in Westchester County, New York, and it was very cold and windy that day. I was in charge of assigning volunteer roles, and my favorite part of my job was picking who could wear the polar bear costume and the chicken costume. (The polar bear is the mascot of the Polar Plunge, and the chicken is for those who are too chicken to plunge.)

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Staten Island Polar Plunge

The Staten Island Polar Plunge was next! It happened December 6 at the Vanderbilt in Staten Island, and I was in charge of the volunteers there too. Both of the plunges were huge successes and raised over $95,000 each! Special Olympics New York City is so lucky that it has such committed people in the community who not only raise money for our athletes, but also show their support by running into extremely cold water.

For both plunges, it was fun and inspiring to see the huge amounts of people from the community who had raised money for Special Olympics. They were so excited for the day. I didn’t plunge at the Westchester Plunge, but I did in Staten Island. After Staten Island, I can understand why people do it. Yes, it was freezing, but it was also exhilarating. After helping the plunges raise so much money for Special Olympics, it felt awesome to toast the success by plunging!

Here are some photos from both of the events:

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Here is a video of me plunging. I’m happy that my supervisor, Kaitlin, did it with me!

 

The 2015 Athlete Leadership Connection

IMG_0265On October 19, the Women’s Sports Foundation, a NYC nonprofit that promotes women in sports, hosted its first Athlete Leadership Connection. Held in the Morgan Stanley Headquarters in Times Square, the event brought together collegiate and professional female athletes, including Olympians and Paralympians.

IMG_0267.jpgThe main purpose of the day was to help collegiate and professional athletes with their futures. Women who were already professionals, whether in athletics or business, participated and led panels throughout the day that were designed to aid athletes who wanted to change from being an athlete into something else. Some of the panels were “Identifying Your Brand,” “Careers in Sports Journalism and Broadcasting,” “Financial Literacy,” and “Career Opportunities in Athletic Leadership.” There were even mock interviews set up with various companies.

I volunteered during the second half of the day, so I wasn’t able to see many of the panels. However, I was able to see the last one of the day and the one I think was coolest. “Project Connection” was very similar to Shark Tank, the show where entrepreneurs present their products to wealthy and influential people who could fund them.

The participating athletes were divided into three teams, and each team was given a concept. The teams had a very small amount of time to put together an idea worthy of being presented to an Angel, someone who could fund their idea. Then, they presented their work, and it was very fun to watch and listen.

The first was a Title IX App that was geared toward education about Title IX, a law that prohibits sexual discrimination in any sports or federally funded activity. They intended to start promoting it with high school students, so they would be able to know their rights before college. After their presentation, the Angels were able to ask questions in order to get more information. One of them asked, “What will we get back in return?” and an athlete answered, “Awareness.”

The second was a Fans in the Stands App that would be designed to get more fans for women’s sports. They would start the app with college students and then expand it to high school and professional sports. There would be a number of rewards and promotions that would benefit those who had the app and went to female athletes’  competitions and games.

The third was an idea called Candid Conversations. Female professional athletes would speak to current female student athletes on college campuses about transitioning from a sports-focused life to a career-focused life. It would be a speaker series similar to TED Talks that would help collegiate athletes develop professional skills. To start, there would be nine speeches at nine different universities with 1800 students reached.

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The winners!

After the athletes presented their ideas, the Angels went out of the room to discuss each one, and when they returned, they announced that they would give Candid Conversations $31,000 for the first year with an extra $20,000 to train the athlete speakers in public speaking. The second year, they would give $50,000 if the first year’s results were good. It was very exciting that the Angels agreed to fund one of the ideas! I look forward to hearing about how Candid Conversations is doing in 2016 and if it is funded again in 2017!

Here is a video of the day from the Women’s Sports Foundation:

 

For more information about the Athlete Leadership Connection and any of the other work the Women’s Sports Foundation does, here is its website:  http://www.womenssportsfoundation.org

Hello 2016!

Happy New Year! I can’t believe it’s already 2016!

2015 was an awesome year for me. I volunteered at the Special Olympics World Games, started interning at Special Olympics New York, created this blog, met two of my heroes, made a lot of amazing new friends, and was accepted to volunteer at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro! 2015 made me really excited for 2016!

In honor of 2016, here is a list of 16 things I am excited about for 2016.

  1. VOLUNTEERING AT THE RIO OLYMPICS!!!!!!! 112414-OLYMPIC-2016-MASCOT-AS-PI.vadapt.620.high.55
  2. Watching the Olympics in person!
  3. Going to the Olympic Village in Rio.
  4. Exploring Rio de Janeiro.
  5. Trading Olympic pins with people from all over the world.
  6. Continuing to intern at Special Olympics New York.
  7. Growing my blog and updating it more frequently.
  8. Meeting more people who love the Olympic Movement just as much as I do!
  9. Graduating from Pace University in December 2016.
  10. Getting my first full-time job!IMG_4864
  11. Volunteering around the city (and writing blog posts about it!).
  12. Writing my senior thesis on the Olympic Movement.
  13. Turning 21.
  14. More Special Olympics New York competitions!
  15. Learning Portuguese.
  16. Summer ❤
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Happy New Year in Portuguese

 Happy 2016 to all of my followers! Here’s to another gold medal year!

Katy Sanchez: Special Olympics Athlete

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Katy, me, and Doug before the Opening Ceremony

Even though we are both from New York, are involved with Special Olympics New York, and actually live a little more than an hour away from each other, I didn’t meet Katy Sanchez until I went to Los Angeles. We were both at the Just-in-Time Training for volunteers at the World Games. I thought I had seen her before (and I had), so I introduced myself to her and her mom, Susan. It was great to find fellow New Yorkers in LA! We met up a few more times in LA, helped each other to get around on the metro, and then I saw her and her mom at the most recent State Games in October where she competed in golf.

Katy’s passion about Special Olympics is really inspiring and powerful. She is a speaker, a Global Messenger for Special Olympics New York, and a very good, competitive, and committed Special Olympics athlete in the Hudson Valley Region. Even though she didn’t qualify for the World Games this summer, she still came to volunteer and support the athletes. She was also kind enough to grant the Olympics of Blogs an interview. 🙂

The Olympics of Blogs: How long have you been participating in 10156791_634675696625264_6607710400034735330_nSpecial Olympics?

Katy: I started Special Olympics in 2007. I started with Basketball. Special Olympics has changed my life

The Olympics of Blogs: What sports do you compete in?

Katy: The sports I compete in are golf, soccer, floor hockey, basketball, track and field, cycling, and I even do triathlons.

The Olympics of Blogs: What is your favorite sport?

Katy: My favorite sport is basketball because my brother taught me how to play the game.

The Olympics of Blogs: What is your favorite thing about Special Olympics?

Katy: My favorite thing about Special Olympics is that we have mutual respect for each other.

The Olympics of Blogs: How many medals have you won?

Katy: I’ve won 99 medals so far; more are coming this year!

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The Olympics of Blogs: What was your favorite experience at Special Olympics?

Katy: My favorite experience is becoming a Global Messenger for Special Olympics New York. I enjoy speaking about Special Olympics to the community!

11825905_999410680081612_7962135851699404854_nThe Olympics of Blogs: What was your job at the World Games?

Katy: I was an athlete volunteer at the World Games in LA in July of 2015. I volunteered at soccer and received soccer balls, and one day at Tennis, I helped out the fans!

The Olympics of Blogs: Based on your experience at the World Games, how is volunteering as a Special Olympics athlete different from competing?

Katy: My experience as volunteering at World Games in LA in July of 2015 was that I got to support other athletes that were competing!

The Olympics of Blogs: What other Games have you been to, either as a competitor or a volunteer?

Katy: I’ve been to National Games in 2010 in Lincoln, Nebraska, for track and field with Team Virginia. Also in 2010, I got to go to Latin America with my Team Virginia Area 26 teammates [for the Latin American Games]. Also I went to the 2014 USA Games in New Jersey for triathlon with Team New York.

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Katy at the Team USA Games

The Olympics of Blogs: Have you ever done any speaking activities for Special Olympics? What were those?

Katy: I have done a lot speaking opportunities, but my favorite one was New York City Gala, where my speech was a moving one!! I spoke in front of 700 people.

The Olympics of Blogs: What does Special Olympics mean to you?

Katy: Special Olympics means family. I have always said it’s my second family because we protect each other. It also means accepting who we are. Also, we are inspiration to others.

The Olympics of Blogs: Is there anything else you’d like to say?

Katy: BE A FAN OF Special Olympics! I would love to see more Unified teams in high schools and colleges!!

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Katy at the Rockland Polar Plunge this past weekend

Katy’s goal is to be an International Global Messenger for Special Olympics International and/or to compete in the World Games. Good luck, Katy!

My Interview with Greg Louganis

12179421_10205593663180662_723909234_n-1On Sunday, October 25, I traveled to the Bow Tie Cinemas in Chelsea to see NewFest’s premiere of the HBO documentary, Back on Board: Greg Louganis. Greg Louganis is one of my favorite Olympic athletes because of his true commitment to the values of the Olympic Movement. He is actually one of the reasons why I began diving.

I don’t want to spoil the film, but here’s a short bio of his experience with the Olympic Movement. According to his website, he “is widely considered the greatest diver in history,” and because he won a silver medal in the 1976 Games, two gold medals (on 3 meter and 10 meter) at the 1984 Games, and two gold medals (on 3 meter and 10 meter) at the 1988 Games, I would agree. Most people remember his bravery after he hit his head on the board, continued diving within the hour, and won gold at the 1988 Games.

After the 1988 Games, he retired, and then in 1995, he and Eric Marcus wrote his autobiography, Breaking the Surface, where he came out as gay and HIV+. Back on Board is about his experiences while he was competing, at the Seoul Games, after he came out, his advocacy, and his current work as a mentor for USA Diving.

Incredibly, I was able to meet and interview him on the documentary, preparing for the Rio Olympics, and many other things. Below is the interview. You can watch the documentary on HBO GO and HBO NOW.

The Olympics of Blogs: What do you hope people walk away with from your film?

imagesGreg: Well, you know, it’s interesting because I’m just the subject matter, and it’s the director, Cheryl Furjanic, and [producer/writer] Will Sweeney who really chose what to focus on, how to tell the story, and what story to tell. We were together for three and a half years in the process, so they really had a lot to choose from. They focused on the diving and my entry back into the sport of diving. There’s some current day stuff mixed in there as far as challenges I’ve been through and so, I think what I found people take away from it most is that no matter how much you achieve, we’re all human. We all make mistakes. We all make good decisions and bad decisions because we’re human. That’s what people come away with. It’s the humanity.

It was interesting because it’s been focused on the LGBT film festival, but I’ve been getting responses from [many people]. One, which is very meaningful, was from a straight black woman, and she wrote that after viewing the documentary, she found the courage to come out to her friends and loved ones about her HIV status. She has two daughters who I’m assuming are HIV-.

And [the audience will come away from it with] how challenging it is in various communities – you know, the stigma surrounding HIV/AIDS and the stigma of being LGBT. You know, all of those things. We’ve come a long way, and the advances in treatments since I was diagnosed in ’88 are wonderful. That I’m still here is truly amazing because when I was diagnosed in ’88, I didn’t think I’d see 30. Everyone was dying.

Even when I saw the film for the first time, I learned a lot because in a part of the film, I said that, “An atomic bomb could have gone off, and I never would have known.” That’s how focused I was on being successful in my sport and doing my homework, getting ready, preparation, and all that. I heard about AIDS, and that was kind of out there. I had friends who were dying, and it really brought home the gravity of what was happening at that time. I find that people are coming away [from this film] with its persistence and tenacity of hanging in there and believing things will work out.

The Olympics of Blogs: What are some of the differences between writing a book and being involved in this film?

Greg: Well, I worked with my coauthor, Eric Marcus. We started back in ’93, and that was a whole process. I knew that I wanted to share my story, and the only way I felt that I could do it justice was through a book. Eric is incredibly thorough, and working on it was very cathartic. But at the same time, there were points in the process of our working together where I wasn’t ready emotionally to deal with it. He really forced me to revisit and examine areas of my life where I just really didn’t want to go.

Eventually, I got there, and I think that was what was so telling. It was a New York Times bestseller for five weeks because it was so revealing and raw. I thought that I was sharing my weaknesses, but on book tour, I realized by sharing my weaknesses, I was actually sharing my strength. That’s kind of how I perceived this process of doing a documentary when I was approached by Cheryl Furjanic and Will Sweeney. I felt confident that I was in good hands, and my story would be treated with love and respect.

The Olympics of Blogs: How did it feel to go back to diving after such a long time?

Greg: It was nice. I like the capacity that I came back in as athlete mentor. That’s been so meaningful. I feel impactful.

We are going to be in a tough spot in Rio. The state of diving right now globally is the entire world is chasing China. Mexico has poured millions and millions of dollars into their diving program, and it’s showing. They’re really coming onto the scene strong. Canada has a wonderful program. They know that they can’t support all of the elite athletes, so they pick and choose the athletes they feel have the best shot at success. Then they pour their resources into those athletes. It’s a very different model from what USA Diving is using. They [USA Diving] disbanded the National Training Center, which I feel is a huge mistake. I’d really like to see much more coaches’ collaboration and more of a sense of a U.S. team. I love what Canada does with their One Team campaign.

Right now in the states, it’s a little bit more about this club against that club against that club. If they [the club] have a talent, their tendency is to hold onto that talent to gain recognition. It really should be a collaborative effort in order to be successful. We have some tremendous talent, but we need to share resources, especially since many of the facilities are limited. There’s not that many full on dive facilities around the country. They are few and far between. To share resources, to share knowledge, and to share experiences is the only way we’re going to be successful.

The Olympics of Blogs: How will the U.S. men’s 10 meter platform diving be in Rio?*

Greg: David Boudia is still continuing. He gets it, which is exciting for me to see. They teamed him up. His synchro partner is Steele Johnson, who is a young kid, and he can mentor Steele through the process. Also, being teamed with a diver who is better than you elevates your performance. You rise to the occasion. I think that is very powerful and impactful.

*Greg won gold for the 10 meter platforming diving at the 1984 and 1988 Olympics. In 2012, U.S. diver David Boudia won gold. I’m also going to see this event in Rio, so it was interesting to see what Greg thought about it.

The Olympics of Blogs: How did it feel to carry the Special Olympics flag in the World Games’ Opening Ceremony?

Greg: It was great. It was a great honor to be with all those guys. I had a lot of fun.

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Carrying the flag